RVL meets reality – Mindfulness, Crisis prevention and tossing away old baggage Part 3.

Stress Tolerance, Balance and Acceptance
Written and Presented by
Tim

DISCLAIMER – PLEASE READ

Ladies and gentlemen, readers, I write this as a presentation to make suggestions for people who need to get a little self-wellness into their sphere. I need to make it absolutely clear that I am NOT a medical professional, I am NOT a Psychiatric professional or a Crisis Counselor.

I AM a survivor and this material is material I have found that works for me. Doesn’t mean it’s going to work for you but then again, it just might.

The information I contain in here is NOT something I just made up on the spur of the moment, it is carefully sourced from relevant and reliable sources, HOWEVER, it is NOT meant, nor intended, to replace or discount proper care and attention from qualified medical/psychological/psychiatric professionals. If you are in trouble PLEASE SEEK HELP IMMEDIATELY, DON”T WAIT. Contact your nearest Crisis Line, Doctor or Healthcare Centre. DON’T TRY AND GO IT ALONE…

That being said, I offer the following for your consideration.

Img source: healthmeup.com

Img source: healthmeup.com

Good morning,
Every day, when I get up, before I approach what needs to be done through the day, before I begin working on some task or tasks and especially when I sit down to the computer and sign in to any of my OVC accounts, I compose myself. I practice mindfulness and I employ a meditative and relaxing practice that puts my mind in the here and now. I use the time to achieve an inner equilibrium and to foster a balance between my needs and expectations and the realities that I will encounter throughout the day. I learned this over a period of several years in the late eighties to early nineties and I reinforced, in a formal learning setting, late in 2014.

It is something which, to my mind, is such an integral part of myself that I can call upon it, pretty much in any situation, to take the stress out of a situation and be able to deal with it calmly, deliberately and in a timely manner. It is not magick, it is not sleight-of-hand and it is NOT delusion, it is ACCEPTANCE.

Stress tolerance and management…

There’s an old saying about stress, “Stress is the physiological and psychological reaction that occurs when a person is prevented from strangling the life out of someone who desperately deserves it…!

Cute huh? Unfortunately that’s only one type of stress and the solution is neither practical nor legal, so how do we cope with stress? What can we do to lessen its impact and, just as importantly, its longer term cumulative effects?

As you read through this part of the presentation you will recognize certain principles in play that were covered in Part 1 and 2 of the document. That’s because it all ties together, true, at this time you have two parts of the equation, this will connect with the first two and then, in part4 – the last part – we will look at how the whole comes together. As I have mentioned before, this is only a brief presentation based on work and methods that are employed in rehabilitation and outpatient programs right here in the United States today.

Img. source: www.boundless.com

Img. source: www.boundless.com

What is stress?
Stress is the way that we respond to changes in our lives. It is the way our bodies react physically, emotionally, cognitively and behaviorally.”

Change can be both positive and negative that cause stress and even imagined changes can cause stress. It is true, and accepted, that we need some stressors in our lives to keep us stimulated and motivated.

The other thing that we need to be aware of is that stress, and reactions to it, are highly individualized. No two people will experience, nor react to, the same stressor in the same way.

Chronic Stress
Our body’s hormonal system is important to help us cope with the demands of stress on a daily basis, at a low level. If the stress hormones are repeatedly triggered, and are intense, then disease will occur. YES – negative stress effects are recognized as a disease.

Below are a list of symptoms that we are adversely suffering from stress:

Physical: Tension, fatigue, insomnia, muscular aches, digestive upsets, radical appetite changes, headaches and general restlessness.

Mental (cognitive): Forgetfulness, low productivity, confusion, impaired concentration, lethargy, negativity, “busy” mind that is not able to be controlled and calmed.
Emotional: Anxiety, mood swings, irritability, depression, resentment, anger, impatience, worry, feeling of being “pressured” even when you are not being pressured.
Social: Unreasonable outbursts, decreased sex drive, lack of intimacy and withdrawal into isolation, intolerance, feelings of loneliness, avoidance of social events/ situations, increases in alcohol, tobacco or recreational drug use.
Spiritual: Apathy, loss of direction, feeling “empty”, losing sight of goals, being unforgiving and losing one’s sense of purpose.

The S.T.O.P. System
One of the quickest ways of tackling individual stress situations as they arise is known as The S.T.O.P. System.

S: stop
Tell yourself, out loud if necessary, Stop..! Relax, I can handle my anger/stress.

T: think
Tell yourself, don’t take it personally, don’t jump to conclusions and don’t make mountains from molehills.
O: others
Try to understand the other point/s of view and respect the rights of others while putting your point of view across.
P: pick
The alternatives for expressing your anger/irritation in an acceptable manner. Examine the pros and cons of expressing your anger. Make your “expressing” appropriate to the circumstances and then, after the fact, analyse how well you handled the situation and your anger.

Img. source: forwallpaper.com

Img. source: forwallpaper.com

What happens if stress reaches crisis point?

The worst effects (symptoms) from our list above will kick in and you may well find yourself lost in a dark, deep place with no idea of how to get out. IT IS TEMPORARY and the first thing to remember is DON’T PANIC.

Draw back from the crisis, unless it is a matter of imminent injury or death – that’s when adrenaline kicks in.

From a cognitive point of view there are several methods you can employ to lessen and manage the “crisis”.

The primary method is to DISTRACT yourself with other activities. This could be as simple as taking ten minutes to go outside, go for a short walk etc. This is a good example of the “walk away” theory. Distraction, in its simplest terms, means to reduce contact with the emotional stimuli that are causing the stress.

A: You can distract yourself with activities, for example physical activity helps you to feel better because when you engage in physical activity your body releases endorphins.

C: You can distract yourself by contributing, either to someone, some organization or some other form of active contribution to somebody other than you.

C: You can distract, believe it or not, with comparisons. Watch a disaster movie, visit an E.R. Waiting room, and compare yourself to people who are suffering greater stresses tan yourself.

E: You can distract by employing “opposing emotions”, for example, if you are sad watch a movie that makes you laugh. If you are tense listen to music that makes you relax.

P: Push away; that is to say, separate yourself from the stressors. Walk away for a while, find something else to do, meditate, clear your head and thoughts and just ignore the situation for a short while Take a ‘ME’ time-out.
T: Thoughts can also help you distract, turn your mind away from the stressful thinking patterns, imagine a serene place you would like to visit; remember times and places where you were happy and had fun. Look out the window at a tree or some other object, study it, think about it, and focus on it. By doing these things you can distract yourself quite easily from negative thought patterns, even if only for a little while to give your body time to regroup.
S: Sensations can be used, to various intensities, to distract the cognition. For example, hold ice cubes, squeeze a rubber ball hard and repetitively, take a shower, listen to loud music, have sex, snap a rubber band on the back of your hand. Intense sensations over power the cognitive thinking because they are linked to several of the primary functions of the body – protection, pleasure, survival etc.

A-C-C-E-P-T-S

The wise mind Accepts” ~ a handy little phrase to remember these steps.

'No stress' by Camille Besneville on deviantart.com

‘No stress’ by Camille Besneville on deviantart.com

Accepting reality
Stress, and its symptoms, are caused by circumstances. You don’t have to like the circumstances but a key factor in fighting the stress that is within you is accepting the situation at face value, accepting it for what it is in the here and now.

We each need to cultivate several things in respect of this;
We need to cultivate ‘Willingness’. A willingness to do the right thing in the situation, a willingness to be proactive in changing the situation and reducing, or removing, the stressors.
We need to cultivate a healthy opposition to ‘Willfulness’. Willfulness is defined as doing the opposite of what works, resisting changes and refusing opportunities to make the changes that will positively impact the situation.

We need to ‘Turn the Mind’, by an act of choice we need to make the commitment, to ourselves, to follow the right path and commit to accepting the reality of situations in a calm, balanced and deliberate manner.

Radical acceptance comes from within and when the inner person is free from fighting against the reality of a situation then the mind is free to accommodate solutions. By stopping yourself from fighting the anger, the rage and the stress will dissipate and leave you in a position to accept, accommodate and change in a positive and beneficial manner. When you ACCEPT you will FEEL better.

Copyright RVL & TB 2015

References:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotion
http://www.intropsych.com/ – Dr. Dewey
S. T. Charles, J. R. Piazza, J. Mogle, M. J. Sliwinski, D. M. Almeida. The Wear and Tear of Daily Stressors on Mental Health. Psychological Science, 2013; DOI: 10.1177/0956797612462222
www.getselfhelp.co.uk Vivyan, Carol 2009
Skills Training Manual for Treating Borderline Personality Disorder. Linehan, Marsha. 1993, The Guilford Press.

NB: Where used, quoted portions of other works are reproduced under the “fair use for education” provisions of relevant legislations.

The views and opinions presented in this article are the opinions of the author and/or contributors and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of The Owner/s of RVL, their officers, assigns or agents. RVL and its officers do not personally, individually, or jointly necessarily recommend or condone any of the activities or practices represented.

This information is freely available to all FOR PERSONAL USE only, it may be reproduced, or linked to, on personal web sites WITH FULL CREDIT but it may not be used for commercial purposes nor for general distribution without PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT from Real Vampire Life and/or our guest/s.
For further details please see our Website Disclaimer

RVL meets reality – Mindfulness, Crisis prevention and tossing away old baggage Part 1.

DISCLAIMER – PLEASE READ

Ladies and gentlemen, readers, I write this as a presentation to make suggestions for people who need to get a little self-wellness into their sphere. I need to make it absolutely clear that I am NOT a medical professional, I am NOT a Psychiatric professional or a Crisis Counselor.

I AM a survivor and this material is material I have found that works for me. Doesn’t mean it’s going to work for you but then again, it just might.

The information I contain in here is NOT something I just made up on the spur of the moment, it is carefully sourced from relevant and reliable sources and it is material employed in health care centres in post hospital programs, HOWEVER, it is NOT meant, nor intended, to replace or discount proper care and attention from qualified medical/psychological/psychiatric professionals. If you are in trouble PLEASE SEEK HELP IMMEDIATELY, DON”T WAIT. Contact your nearest Crisis Line, Doctor or Healthcare Centre. DON’T TRY AND GO IT ALONE…

That being said, I offer the following for your consideration.

Mindfulness, Crisis prevention and tossing away old baggage

Written and Presented by
Tim

Introduction

People around us, everyday, in many ways, love to push buttons. Some people push buttons for a job, like operating a lathe or a drill, others push buttons to move money and information around but the buttons we need to be most aware of are our buttons. The ones that people push just because they can, just because they take a perverse pleasure in seeing/ experiencing a reaction.

Those people feed off us, they get amusement from seeing the negative reactions that their antics cause and each time we rise to the bait, so to speak, each time we react in a negative way you can bet your ass that somewhere, some individual is laughing their ass off. So, why do we give them the satisfaction?

We give them this power when we are weary, weakened by some physical event; such as illness or trouble in our lives. Why shouldn’t we give this away? Because then we become responsible for feeding leeches, we become responsible for the wellbeing and happiness of others, well, for parasites anyway.

So, what do we do to stop feeding the leeches and parasites? We train ourselves NOT to react. They might be in the same sandpit as us but if you exercise your mastery and take away their bucket and spade, well, they’re screwed and then we can sit back and laugh at them as they flail about in a vain attempt to satisfy their silly craving for negativity.

In a recent post I addressed the concept, briefly, of Mushin;

Mushin (無心; Japanese mushin; English translation “no mind”) is a mental state into which very highly trained martial artists are said to enter during combat.[1] They also practice this mental state during everyday activities. The term is shortened from mushin no shin (無心の心), a Zen expression meaning the mind without mind and is also referred to as the state of “no-mindness”. That is, a mind not fixed or occupied by thought or emotion and thus open to everything.

Mushin is achieved when a person’s mind is free from thoughts of anger, fear, or ego during combat or everyday life. There is an absence of discursive thought and judgment, so the person is totally free to act and react towards an opponent without hesitation and without disturbance from such thoughts. At this point, a person relies not on what they think should be the next move, but what is their trained natural reaction or what is felt intuitively. It is not a state of relaxed, near-sleepfulness, however. The mind could be said to be working at a very high speed, but with no intention, plan or direction.

Some masters believe that mushin is the state where a person finally understands the uselessness of techniques and becomes truly free to move. In fact, that person will no longer even consider themselves as “fighters” but merely living beings moving through space.
Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushin

Img. source - themonastryofnothingness.blogspot.com

Img. source – themonastryofnothingness.blogspot.com

 

Along with this concept are the seemingly less esoteric tenets of Mindfulness, Stress reduction, Cognitive thinking and Emotion regulation.

Each tool that we gain the use of in these arenas will invariably help us to achieve a more balanced perspective in our lives, and greater resistance to both leeches and parasites, both on and off line.

Part 1

Mindfulness, at its core, is itself derived from ancient Eastern practices and is a very simple and stand-alone concept.

Mindfulness means paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally” [2]
Mindfulness is not competitive with any belief set or religion, it simply a particular way of looking at things and the tools are just as simple, however, because Mindfulness is fundamentally so much different to the way our minds are generally taught, and experienced, to behave in this day and age it does take some practice to master it.

In essence it is a method of learned control of our focus of attention.

A great deal of the time we operate, cognitively, on ‘auto-pilot’, brushing our teeth, driving a car, data entry at work. We are not fully focused on what we are doing and because of that we can make mistakes, sometimes with grave consequences. Becoming more aware of our thoughts and feelings in a particular moment gives us greater focus and thus we are capable of achieving more than if we were ‘on autopilot’.

So, what’s a good way to find this ‘mindfulness thing’? In short there are many ways but probably the one that is most familiar to the majority is to do with controlled breathing. One good method is a breathing meditation developed by Kabat-Zinn in 1991. The exercise itself takes about fifteen minutes and is recommended, by the author, to be done once a day.

Process:
Assume a comfortable posture, whether it be sitting or lying down. If you are sitting let the shoulders drop but keep the spine straight. (Closing your eyes is optional)
Focus your attention on your belly, feel it rise, or expand, gently on the in-breath and fall on the out-breath. Keep your focus on the breathing, feeling the rise and fall, being ‘with’ on each full duration in breath and each full duration out breath. A variant on this method is to breathe in for the count of four and out on the count of four, then in for the count of six and out for the count of six, then for the count of eight and so forth. The expelled breath carries away the things that pollute your thinking. Imagine this during the process and gradually slow your breathing until each one is steady, deep and even.

If your mind wanders away from focus on the breathing, bring it right on back. I use this as both an aid to sleep and as a relaxation technique when embroiled in something taxing or demanding. Heck, you can even do it standing in a bus shelter… waiting for that late bus.

meditation4

You can use Mindfulness to cope with negative emotions/experiences in the moment.

Practicing the mindfulness on a daily basis, as with anything else, makes you good at it. So good that you can call it up at a moment’s notice, in any given situation.

 

Img. source - adamseo25.wordpress.com

Img. source – adamseo25.wordpress.com

Let’s take a classic example and one we can, i think, all relate to. Someone pushes in line in front of you at a supermarket or somewhere like that, what’s the best course of action? Get angry? What do you do then? Speak sharply to them? Mutter about how some people shouldn’t be allowed out in public alone under your breath? Reach up and bitch-slap them back behind you (hence winding up with an assault arrest)…? What to do, what to do?

Me, I breathe… in for the count of four, out for the count of four, in for the count of six, out for the count of six… and so forth. I remind myself that life is too short to get all riled up by them, I feel sorry that they feel they need to be rude and aggressive. Learn to become an Observer rather than a pawn of the game.

If you read a message posted in an online forum that really irritates or annoys you, same thing applies. Breathe. Get relaxed then look at the words with fresh eyes. Is the person really attacking you or are they just trying to get a rise out of somebody to satisfy some weird craving they have for pushing buttons? Do the words materially alter your existence by being there? Do the words make sense even? (That’s a big thing online)

In the words of Kabat-Zinn;
“You can’t stop the waves but you can learn to surf.”

Mindfulness is about being “in the moment”, here and now, present and accounted for and learning to view events and circumstances as fleeting situations. If you can look at things without old feelings, baggage, angers, hates, fears and what not then you really will find that such “events” do not control you, rather YOU CONTROL them. In this way you can take ownership of your thoughts and feelings and you can keep anyone from having access to your “buttons”.

Mindfulness and Mushin, they come from the same places, the same train of thinking and they can be powerful allies to you in times of stress. They can help you overcome worries and cares, they can help you with inner balance and harmony and they can help you keep the assholes from running your life, true story… I achieved it and I’m no Rhodes Scholar.

To be Continued…

Copyright Tim & RVL 2015

1) A Dictionary of the Martial Arts. Louis Frederic (author), Paul H Crompton (editor). 2006. Dover Publications Inc.. ISBN 978-0486444024
2) Vivyan, Carol; 2009 www.getselfhelp.co.uk/

Other references:
Skills Training Manual for Treating Borderline Personality Disorder. Linehan, Marsha. 1993, The Guilford Press.

NB: Where used, quoted portions of other works are reproduced under the “fair use for education” provisions of relevant legislations.
The views and opinions presented in this article are the opinions of the author and/or contributors and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of The Owner/s of RVL, their officers, assigns or agents. RVL and its officers do not personally, individually, or jointly necessarily recommend or condone any of the activities or practices represented.

This information is freely available to all FOR PERSONAL USE only, it may be reproduced, or linked to, on personal web sites WITH FULL CREDIT but it may not be used for commercial purposes nor for general distribution without PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT from Real Vampire Life.

For further details and TOU, please see our Website Disclaimer

Vampire health matters… to all of us

dark-beauty-beauty-black-dark-girl-goth-gothic-mysterious-white-960x640ATTENTION: Nothing in this editorial is intended to replace, dismiss nor challenge the advice of a trained and properly qualified medical and/or psychological professional. If you are experiencing unusual physical or psychological sensations, or symptoms, please consult your healthcare provider IMMEDIATELY.

Presented by

T.

In 2012, shortly following “the great crash”, we re-uploaded a piece entitled “How can I tell if I’m a vampire?

Originally authored maybe a year, or so earlier, it attempted to address some of the questions that we at RVL were faced with regularly.

In it I wrote;
People who are asking whether they might be a vampire are looking for something, either about themselves or their environment and existence. No one can tell you why you feel the way you do because no one is there, feeling what you feel, seeing what you see and thinking what you think. The commonly reported “characteristics” of those who self-identify as real vampires can also be influenced, and hence appear differently, by genetics, environment, health, medications being used (prescribed or not) life stresses and pressures, influence from peer groups, family and personal inhibition can all play a part in developing “odd feelings” in a person.

The psychological impact of media and entertainment cannot be ruled out as having some influence either. No longer are vampires’ undead evil monsters that rise from their graves at night to attack the living and drink their blood. Today, in popular fiction and film, vampires are just as likely to be relatively normal looking, pale skinned, angsty teens who face all the normal problems of any other teenager. It is a new archetype that is much more palatable to a great many.
No one, not I, nor any other can tell you on the internet or otherwise, that you are a vampire and you should be VERY cautious of anyone who claims they can. There are people who will tell you whatever you want to hear with some personal and possibly unsavory motive behind their actions.”

The deeper, and often hidden, triggers that may drive the development of the “Vampire” presence you sense can, more often than not, be ascribed to a number of other causes and it is of vital importance that these causes are examined BEFORE you think anything strange about yourself.

Psychology1The “Vampire” psyche

In her dissertation on vampire psychology, Margaret L. Shanahan wrote;

Jungian psychoanalysts point to the worldwide interest in the vampire as evidence of its archetypal nature. From a Jungian perspective, the myriad varieties of vampire narratives found cross-culturally throughout history indicate that these images are not merely by-products of personal experience but are grounded in species-wide psychological structures. In other words, vampire images reflect significant experiences and issues that are universal in human lives around the world. In short, there is something about the vampire that we already understand intuitively-with the knowledge coming from deep within our psyche.” [1]

If this is true then what you may be experiencing is an upwelling of that deeply ingrained psychological model. In comments made to the Guardian newspaper, In Britain, Edinburgh based forensic psychologist Ian Stephen observed;
The cult of vampirism is to do with power and dominance, using blood to give you energy and immortality. If someone had ridiculed him, he may have needed to compensate for this – something like vampirism may have given him what he was looking for.” At the time he was speaking of a convicted “vampire” killer.

 

Medical-ResearchHealth considerations

There are known to be a number of medical illnesses that cause symptoms which might, with a stretch of the imagination, be construed as being indicative of being a vampire… unfortunately, or fortunately, you are NOT going to be able to be “turned” into a vampire. If you hang out with the right crowd long enough some of their manner and demeanour might rub off and you will find yourself mimicking your peers – it doesn’t mean you’re a vampire all of a sudden.

One medical condition that is popularly cited as being cause for thoughts of vampires is porphyria. The porphyrias are a class of illness of inherited, or acquired, disorders of certain enzymes that participate in the production of porphyrins and heme. (Incidence: Rare)

Acute porphyrias
The acute, or hepatic, porphyrias primarily affect the nervous system, resulting in abdominal pain, vomiting, acute neuropathy, muscle weakness, seizures and mental disturbances, including hallucinations, depression, anxiety and paranoia. Cardiac arrhythmias and tachycardia (high heart rate) may develop as the autonomic nervous system is affected. Pain can be severe and can, in some cases, be both acute and chronic in nature. Constipation is frequently present, as the nervous system of the gut is affected, but diarrhea can also occur.

Given the many presentations and the relatively low occurrence of porphyria, the patient may initially be suspected to have other, unrelated conditions. For instance, the polyneuropathy of acute porphyria may be mistaken for Guillain-Barré syndrome, and porphyria testing is commonly recommended in those situations. Systemic lupus erythematosus features photosensitivity and pain attacks and shares various other symptoms with porphyria.

Not all porphyrias are genetic, and patients with liver disease who develop porphyria as a result of liver dysfunction may exhibit other signs of their condition, such as jaundice.
Patients with acute porphyria (AIP, HCP, VP) are at increased risk over their life for hepatocellular carcinoma (primary liver cancer) and may require monitoring. Other typical risk factors for liver cancer need not be present.

Cutaneous porphyrias
The cutaneous, or erythropoietic, porphyrias primarily affect the skin, causing photosensitivity (photodermatitis), blisters, necrosis of the skin and gums, itching, and swelling, and increased hair growth on areas such as the forehead. Often there is no abdominal pain, distinguishing it from other porphyrias.
In some forms of porphyria, accumulated heme precursors excreted in the urine may cause various changes in color, after exposure to sunlight, to a dark reddish or dark brown color. Even a purple hue or red urine may be seen.” [2]

Amongst other conditions that might seem to have “vampiric connotations”, are;

Alliumphobia, is a neurosis that causes extreme aversion, or reaction, to garlic. (Incidence: Rare)

Rabies, or hydrophobia, causes sufferers to demonstrate “vampire-like” symptoms. These may include a desire to bite others. The hydrophobia virus attacks the nervous system wherein it may cause oversensitivity to sunlight and to visual stimuli, such as mirrors.
People who contract the illness often become delirious, aggressive and suffer from hallucinations. The disease can also affect portions of the brain that control sleep patterns, leading to insomnia, nocturnal sleeplessness and hypersexuality,

Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, according to the National Institutes of Health. It is a rare genetic disorder that affects tooth development and causes abnormal development of teeth, which may come at a later than average age. In some cases, many of the teeth are absent except for the canines, which in effect appear to be protruding, and the teeth that do grow in are pointed,

Xeroderma Pigmentosum, or XP, is an extremely rare genetic disorder. It causes a person’s DNA to be unable to effectively repair the damage caused by ultraviolet light. Sufferers of XP develop severe sunburns, even with the most minimal exposure. Other effects can include skin blisters and the development of oozing, raw wounds on the surface. Even some indoor lighting, such as incandescent light bulbs, emit UV rays and should be avoided. Other symptoms of XP may include a painful eye sensitivity to sunlight, causing them to become irritated and appear bloodshot. This may also be accompanied by a glossy white thinning of the skin.

From the very outset of your inquiries you MUST examine ALL medical/ physical possibilities, it could be that you do have an illness which may be life threatening. Please, consult a qualified medical practitioner at the earliest opportunity, if only to be sure in your own mind.

Mind over matter

Let’s assume we’ve covered the major, if rare, medical conditions that might give rise to suspicions of “vampirism”. We need to move on and consider the ramifications of mental health.

One particular study, conducted in 2013 within the vampire sub-culture, revealed the following;
From a set of 250 responses 92 respondents claimed to have NO mental health issues in reference to the presented lists of options.

That left 158 remaining, and those 158 indicated suffering from disorders ranging from a simple clinical Depression all the way up to Schizophrenic disorders and, within these responses, there were those who suspected themselves to be suffering some sort of mental health issue but, as yet, remained undiagnosed.

To put it into a national, United States, perspective “an estimated 26.2 percent of Americans ages 18 and older — about one in four adults — suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year. When applied to the 2004 U.S. Census residential population estimate for ages 18 and older, this figure translates to 57.7 million people
In addition, mental disorders are the leading cause of disability in the U.S. and Canada. Many people suffer from more than one mental disorder at a given time. Nearly half (45 percent) of those with any mental disorder meet criteria for 2 or more disorders, with severity strongly related to comorbidity.” [3]

Again, this is something that can’t be ignored.
If you believe you may be suffering a diagnosable mental health issue please get in touch with a medical professional as quickly as possible. If you experience any symptoms, such as audio or visual anomalies, please get in touch with your health provider as quickly as possible – the longer the delay the worse the problem becomes.

 

As Margaret Shanahan observed in her paper, “Among several narcissistic disorders described by Kohut and Wolf that are relevant for an inquiry into the vampire myth, what they denoted as the “mirror-hungry personalities” is of special importance (Kohut and Wolf, 1978). Mirror-hungry personalities “thirst for self-objects whose confirming and admiring responses will nourish their famished self.” Because of their deep-felt lack of worth and self-esteem, these persons have a compulsive need to evoke the attention and energy of others.
And, “…Wolf elaborates: Despite their discomfort about their need to display themselves and despite their sometimes severe stage fright and shame they must go on trying to find new self-objects whose attention and recognition they seek to induce.

Such mirror-hungry personalities often manifest arrogant superiority. If this arrogance is not affirmed and accepted they will often withdraw into what self-psychologists call “a grandiose retreat” seeking refuge in isolation in order to shore up their self-esteem.

As you can see, there are lots of considerations to be addressed before a person can leap in the air and yell, “Whoooopeeee… I iz a vampire…!” and start sparkling madly, even if everything is checked out and you are medically and psychologically 100%, A-1, Top o’ th’ World you need to be very careful about how you proceed from therein… it’s not always the safest place to be, on the nightside.

Good luck and if you find you have questions that you can’t seem to get straight answers to, please, feel free to contact us by email to – rvlmail@yahoo.com

Kind regards,
T.
ATTENTION: Nothing in this editorial is intended to replace, dismiss nor challenge the advice of a trained and properly qualified medical and/or psychological professional. If you are experiencing unusual physical or psychological sensations, or symptoms, please consult your healthcare provider IMMEDIATELY.

Psychological Perspectives on Vampire Mythology. Shanahan, Margaret L.
2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porphyria#Acute_porphyrias
3. http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/the-numbers-count-mental-disorders-in-america/index.shtml#Intro

Further reading:
Albers JW, Fink JK (2004). “Porphyric neuropathy”. Muscle Nerve 30 (4): 410–422. doi:10.1002/mus.20137. PMID 15372536.
Roelandts R (2000). “The diagnosis of photosensitivity”. Arch Dermatol 136 (9): 1152–1157. doi:10.1001/archderm.136.9.1152. PMID 10987875.
http://www.livescience.com/ – (sister site) Life’s Little Mysteries

 

 

NB: Where used, quoted portions of other works are reproduced under the “fair use for education” provisions of relevant legislations.

The views and opinions presented in this article are the opinions of the author and/or contributors and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of The Owner/s of RVL, their officers, assigns or agents. RVL and its officers do not personally, individually, or jointly necessarily recommend or condone any of the activities or practices represented.

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